Sansar Tutorial: Clothing Creation Using Marvelous Designer

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Lacie, a Linden Lab employee, has made the following tutorial video series and posted it to YouTube and to the Fashion channel on the official Sansar Discord server. In it, she takes the viewer step-by-step through the process of making a shirt in Marvelous Designer 8, texturing it, and then importing it into Sansar to wear on your avatar.

This sort of tutorial is very useful for people (like me), who one day want to become virtual fashion designers in Sansar. I had created twenty articles of clothing for male and female avatars using a previous version of Marvelous Designer last winter, but I haven’t touched the software since February 2017, so this tutorial series is a welcome refresher for me of some nearly-forgotten skills. It’s also perfect for the absolute beginner!

Here’s Part 1, which covers the creation of the clothing in Marvelous Designer (please note that the sound on these videos is really faint, so you will have to turn your speaker volume up to its maximum to be able to hear Lacie’s voiceover, or use headphones):

Part 2 goes over how to texture your clothing:

And finally, Part 3 covers how to export your garment from Marvelous Designer to Sansar:

Thank you, Lacie!

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Sansar Pick of the Day: TurnupVR

I have been seriously remiss in not doing more of my Sansar Pick of the Day profile series, which is something I hope to address in 2019. This particular blogpost is long overdue. Nebulae is one of my favourite creators in Sansar, and a very talented programmer whose enthusiasm for the platform is infectious. I’ve been a big fan of her work ever since she created the fun-to-play Accuracy Training Module experience, which was a simple but wonderful demonstration of Sansar’s scripting abilites at that time.

TurnupVR is a fun and funky curvilinear space with lots of purple neon lighting; essentially it’s a shopping mall and a showcase for Nebulae’s work:

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Scattered throughout are two different kinds of kiosks. The first kind of kiosk is an in-world vendor, which allows you to page through a particular store’s wares, eight panels at a time. Here’s the kiosk that Nebulae very kindly set up for my own brand, RSVF (Ryan Schultz Virtual Fashion), which allows the user to browse through a selection of men’s and women’s clothing I had created using Marvelous Designer:

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Nebulae even included such thoughtful details as a small icon in the upper right corner of each item listing to indicate whether it is for male or female avatars. But the best part is, you can buy the item directly from the kiosk! No need to load up the Sansar Store website! This is a perfect example of Linden Lab stepping back and giving its insanely talented pool of content creators free reign to solve a problem: in this case, the lack of in-world shopping.

The second kind of kiosk gives event organizers the ability to set up a series of stops on a self-guided tour along a particular theme:

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For example, the front kiosk in this row gives the user a list of Christmas light experiences in the local chat window, when it is clicked on:

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Each of the blue links in local chat takes you to a different experience. Each tour also has a dedicated webpage on the TurnupVR website. Nebulae programmed it so that this page is automatically generated when someone sets up one of the themed kiosks in their own experience.

For example, they recently had a Black Friday Shopping tour, and I placed one of the tour kiosks in my Ryan’s Garden experience:

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When a visitor clicks on the kiosk, they can directly buy the item I had placed on sale!

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Here’s a Sansar Atlas link to TurnupVR. There’s also a Discord server for TurnupVR, which you can join.

Happy New Year! Where to Celebrate New Year’s Eve in Social VR

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I will be celebrating New Year’s Eve offline, with real-life friends here in Winnipeg. It looks like we’re going to have a cold night! 😉

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Meanwhile, in Winnipeg…

If you are looking to spend New Year’s Eve online, here are a few options on the various social VR platforms:

Sansar

Eliot (Linden Lab’s Community Manager for Sansar) will be hosting three New Year’s Eve events in Sansar in different timezones:

High Fidelity

High Fidelity will be hosting a round-the-clock event at The Spot from Monday, Dec. 31st 2:00 a.m. to Tuesday, Jan. 1st 4:00 a.m. (Pacific Time).

Sinespace

As part of its Winter Festival, Sinespace is hosting a New Year’s Eve party. Check the login page of your Sinespace client for more details.

VRChat

The best place to find out what New Year’s Eve parties are happening where in VRChat is, as always, the VRChat Events Discord server. Apparently, there’s a round-the-clock party happening at Void, according to AgentM83:

They’re partying in every time zone all day long (started this morning).


However you choose to ring in the new year—online or offline, alone or with friends, awake or asleep!—may 2019 bring you happiness, peace, and prosperity.

 

Editorial: My Social VR/Virtual World Predictions for 2019

Have you joined the RyanSchultz.com Discord yet? Come join 170 avid users of various metaverse platforms, and discuss social VR and virtual world predictions for 2019! More details here


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Time to peer into that crystal ball and make some predictions!

First: Second Life is going to continue to coast along, baffling the mainstream news media and the general public with its vitality and longevity. It will continue to be a reliable cash cow for Linden Lab as they put a portion of that profit into building Sansar. And I also predict that the ability to change your first and last names in SL will prove very popular—and also very lucrative for Linden Lab! Remember, they’ve got seven years of pent-up demand for this feature. (I have a couple of avatars myself that I’d like to rename.)

Second: An unexpected but potentially ground-breaking development in OpenSim was the announcement of the release of a virtual reality OpenSim viewer to the open source community at the 2018 OpenSim Community Conference. There’s still lots of technical work left to do, but if they can successfully pull this off, it could mean a new era for OpenSim.

Third: I confidently predict that one or more blockchain-based virtual worlds are going to fold. Not Decentraland; there’s too much money tied up in that one to fail. But several cryptocurrency-based virtual worlds are starting to look like trainwrecks of epic proportions (and I’m looking at you, Staramaba Spaces/Materia.One). Somebody still needs to explain to me why people will want to pay to hang out with 3D-scanned replicas of Paris Hilton and Hulk Hogan. The business model makes absolutely no sense to me. Another one that I think is going to struggle in 2019 is Mark Space.

Fourth: I also predict that one or more adult/sex-oriented virtual worlds are going to fail (yes, I’m looking at you, Oasis). I’ve already gone into the reasons why even the best of them are going to find it hard to compete against the entrenched front-runner, Second Life.

Fifth: High Fidelity and Sansar will continue their friendly rivalry as both social VR platforms hold splashy events in the new year. (I’m really sorry I missed the recent preview of Queen Nefertari’s tomb in HiFi, but it looks as though there will be many other such opportunities in 2019.) And High Fidelity will continue to boast of new records in avatar capacity at well-attended events (it certainly helps that they’ve got those venture-capital dollars to spend, to offer monetary enticements for users to pile on for stress testing).

Sixth: the Oculus Quest VR headset will ignite the long-awaited boom in virtual reality that the analysts have been predicting for years. There; I’ve said it! And those social VR platforms which support Oculus Quest users will benefit.

Seventh: Linden Lab’s launch of Sansar on Steam will likely have only a modest impact on overall usage of the platform. I’m truly sorry to have to write this prediction, because I love Sansar, but we’ve got statistics we can check, and they are not looking terribly encouraging at the moment. And where is the “significant ad spend” that was promised at one of the in-world product meetups back in November? Now that they’ve pulled the trigger and launched on Steam, it’s time to promote the hell out of Sansar, using every means at Linden Lab’s disposal. Paying bounties to Twitch livestreamers is not enough.

And Facebook? If they thought 2018 was a bad year, I predict that we’re going to see even more scandals uncovered in 2019 by news organizations such as the New York Times. And more people (like me) will decide that they’ve had enough of being sold to other corporations and data-mined to within an inch of their lives, and jump ship. The public relations people at Facebook are going to face a lot of sleepless nights…

And, still on the same topic, we might yet see the launch of a new social VR platform backed by Facebook, after they decide to ditch the lamentable Facebook Spaces once and for all. Maybe it will be based on Oculus Rooms; maybe it will be something completely different. But despite my negative feelings about the social networking side of Facebook, they still have the hardware (Oculus), the money, and the reach to be a game-changer in social VR. (Just not with Facebook Spaces. At this point, they should just kill the project and start over. Any improvements will be like putting lipstick on a pig.)

Finally, I predict that the RyanSchultz.com blog will head off into new and rather unexpected directions (that is, if the past 12 months’ activity is any indication!). I never expected to cover blockchain-based virtual worlds, or Second Life freebies; they just kind of happened.  Expect more of the same in 2019, as various new topics catch my interest.