Let’s Talk Stats: Galen’s New Metaverse Machines Live Sansar Statistics Page

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Image by ColiN00B on Pixabay

There has been much discussion and sometimes heated debate, both here and on other blogs, about the actual level of usage of Sansar, how to measure that usage best, and what those statistics mean. Galen, who is a very talented programmer who builds and sells scripts under the brand name Metaverse Machines, has put together a useful and informative new webpage gathering together various Sansar statistics. Let’s take a look at what he has given us.

First is a list of current statistics:

  • The number of Sansar experiences listed in the Atlas
  • How many people are in how many experiences right now
  • The peak (and average) number of people in Sansar today
  • How many Sansar experiences have been visited in the past 3 hours
  • How many experiences were visited today
  • How many experiences were visited this month

Live Stats 1 1 Sept 2018.png

Galen also lists the four most active Sansar experiences right now, with some statistics for each:

Live Stats 2 1 Sept 2018.png

Finally, he presents charts of daily, weekly, and monthly public visitors to Sansar, showing both peak and average numbers, as well as a chart of the number of Sansar experiences built over time:

Live Stats 3 1 Aept 2018.png

Galen explains the data in the charts:

The following charts come from data collected using a publicly available API. We take a snapshot of all currently listed experiences and how many people are in them approximately every 10 minutes. The “peak” lines represent the highest concurrent head-count across all experiences measured in those snapshots across the whole day (or week). The averages are computed by adding up the total head-count measures for each day (or week) and dividing by the number of snapshots. The gaps between each snapshot make this data imperfect but very solid. To avoid visual confusion, today’s data is excluded.

This is a very handy tool, which will go a long way towards providing a more accurate picture of how much Sansar is being used. You can find Galen’s live stats webpage here.

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Sansar User Concurrency Statistics: A Second Set of Data, with a Look at Maximum User Concurrency Figures

Not too long ago, I shared recent Sansar user concurrency statistics from Gindipple. Gindipple’s figures have sparked a bit of controversy and debate, about what they actually portray. Some have taken away the “fact” that there are never more than 20 people in Sansar at any one time, which is an incorrect interpretation of the data.

Today, I want to share with you another set of user statistics, this one compiled by Galen, who scraped data automatically from the Sansar Atlas in much the same way as Gindipple does. (Galen may be sampling the data more or less often than Gindipple; I didn’t ask either of them how often they sampled the data in the Atlas.)

Galen’s first chart shows minimum (blue line), average (red line) and maximum (yellow line) user concurrency over the past three months (please click on this image to see it in its full size):

Galen says:

…Average concurrency is not what most people care about. They typically care about peak concurrency. And average peak concurrency.

The maximum concurrency values from day to day are more like 20 – 30, even if my calculation of average concurrency hovers around 10. That number is useful but confusing.

And then from week to week, here’s what we see:

Once again, please click on the image below to see it in full size:

Galen adds:

See how the peaks are averaging 30 – 40? That literally means that during each week, there are 30 – 50 people in all experiences at one time for at least one snapshot of time I took during that week. The averages are very interesting, but harder for most people to make sense of.

It actually makes more sense (to me at least) to discuss maximum (or peak) user concurrency figures, rather than average user concurrency figures. Thanks for sharing your statistics, Galen!

Six Months of Average Sansar User Concurrency Statistics

Gindipple has recently released a snapshot of average user concurrency statistics for Sansar over the past six months or so, automatically scraped from the figures of how many avatars are in what experiences from the Sansar Atlas listing. Please click on the image to load it in a larger size:

The upper part of the diagram shows daily average concurrent Sansar users over the past year. There are a lot of peaks and valleys in the data, but what’s disappointing is that the figure never rises above 20 average concurrent users. Now, I have been to events in Sansar that have had up to 35 avatars present (such as the popular Product Meetups), but you have to keep in mind that these are daily averages, so they would be lower.

The smoother data on the bottom of the diagram is monthly average concurrent Sansar users. Notice that there was a slight dip over June, then it rises again.

What’s clear is that the average number of Sansar users is not rising over time; it’s staying flat. So how can Linden Lab attract more people to Sansar, and keep them coming back?

Well, I would argue that adding new features such as custom avatars is a big step toward providing the kind of platform that attracts content creators, who in turn will attract consumers. Bumping up the number of free experiences you can create from 3 to 20 was also a good step in fostering creativity. Finally, I know that a permissions/licensing system for content creators (which Landon told us would be coming sooner rather than later) will also attract new investment in the platform.

What do you think Linden Lab needs to do to attract and keep new users? Should they list Sansar on Steam and the Oculus store? Sound off in the comments, thanks!