Editorial: Linden Lab, Sansar, and Steam

UPDATE 7:35 p.m.: I screwed up. Since I wrote this editorial, I have discovered that Linden Lab has, in fact, been responding to at least a couple of the negative reviews on Steam since January 1st, 2019. (Also, I learned that thumbs-down reviewers can disable comments and follow-up on their reviews.) So I am just going to say, thank you and bravo, LL! I was wrong, I will admit it, and I stand corrected. But what I said below about LL needing to promote Sansar via advertising still stands. And Linden Lab needs to keep on top of the negative reviews on Steam! Some of them raise valid points that need to be addressed.

I have really, really not enjoyed writing this particular editorial, and I’m not looking forward to being painted (again) as a Sansar basher by a certain percentage of my blog readers. Just to make it perfectly clear, and deflect that criticism before it starts again:

I want to stress that this is only one person’s opinion, not an official Sansar spokesperson’s point of view. I still remain a strong Sansar supporter, but I would be neglecting my duties as an independent social VR/virtual worlds blogger if I simply posted nothing but “good news” about Sansar, as some people want me to do.

There are indeed many truly wonderful things about Sansar, and I want Sansar to be a success! And please keep in mind that Sansar is still a BETA platform, and in constant development. There has been much good progress over the past two years. But I still feel—STRONGLY—that Linden Lab should have waited six months to a year before releasing Sansar on Steam. And I stand by my statement, and I feel I have supported it with my arguments. 

However…

It’s time to address a few issues relating to Linden Lab’s launch of Sansar on Steam. This move was supposed to invigorate the platform, and bring in lots of new users, right? And I quote:

Why is Linden Lab pushing to release Sansar on Steam before the end of this year, rather than wait another six months to a year to further polish the platform and add new features?

We want to get more people in, to help refine the product and make it better. We want to start building a community on Steam.

Re: dealing with any negative feedback on Steam, Eliot will pass that along to the appropriate people to deal with and respond to.

Well, here’s the latest statistics on Steam usage of Sansar:

Sansar Stats 8 Jan 2019

We haven’t seen anything like that initial crush of curious users seen in the first few days. And I’m not the only blogger to notice this, either.

And that’s not the only bad news. I don’t know if you’ve looked at the Sansar page on Steam lately, but there are now 34 negative (thumbs down) reviews to 46 positive (thumbs up) reviews, which is the highest ratio of negative-to-positive reviews to date:

Sansar Steam Reviews 8 Jan 2019.png

The review which was voted “most helpful” by Steam users is by 1029chris:

I’m reviewing this from the perspective of a VR user.

It certainly has potential. The engine is absolutely gorgeous, and runs decently. Some of the worlds blew me away with how nice they looked. But I cannot enjoy them.

Sansar has horrible controls in VR. It is very uncomfortable to use. The feeling of embodiment that I can get in other social VR platforms does not happen here. Your virtual hands noticably lag behind your real ones, they have some sort of weird smoothing. Doing any fast body movement in VR detaches your head, and you can watch your decapitated avatar walk up you. They seem to have designed it with more concern regarding how your avatar looks to other people, rather than how it feels to use. It really takes away from the experience. Immersive VR demands the least latency possible, and they’ve deliberately added a lot of latency so that other people see you move more smoothly. It’s very uncomfortable.

Sansars avatar system is also super restrictive. They don’t let you move any bones on their skeleton, and they do EVERYTHING through bones. I can’t rig my hands since they’re too big, and I can’t rig my head since my avatar has a beak. Sansars face animations are all done through bones, but I can’t rig my beak to human face bones. They need to allow more freedom with their avatars. They say that it’s so restrictive because they want marketplace clothes to fit to avatars, but they don’t allow you to put clothes on custom avatars anyways. All of the avatars that I use on other platforms are cartoony with bigger heads, so none of them can have face animations on Sansar. No face animations means it’s less immersive to talk to me. This strictness stifles creativity for everyone, demanding you to conform to their proportions.

Sansar has a lot of potential, and I wish it the best, but I cannot recommend it in its current state.

The next-most-helpful review states:

Are you a fan of Second Life? Do you like the idea of Virtual Reality becoming a literal virtual world? Do you want to Shop, Explore, Build, And Socialize? Then this game will be a massive let down!

Pros: Explore small empty worlds filled with disappointment! Watch your framerate tank lower than Fallout VR! See a massive amount of effort spent on photogrammetry and the passion of SL’s best artists put to waste~

Cons: If you feel socially awkward around groups of people larger than 1 you might run into issues on a couple of the maps. There seems to be an issue with higher graphics settings not buying you the 2080ti you need to run them. I’m trying to get a hold of LL for that.

Non sarcastic review: It was touted as SL 2.0 during its creation and it’s nothing more than a sponsorship friendly ghost town. aka what all of google/facebook’s companies are becoming in 2018. If you wanted to make your own avatar or build something amazing you will be let down by the restrictions and lack of in world tools. This is an oversimplification of SL’s worst attributes wrapped in a bow and **** out onto Steam in a last ditch effort to get people to look at ads.

Edit: I’d like to warn you all the top positive reviews are from people selling things in app. 😛

However, what’s even worse than scathing, sarcastic reviews like this is Linden Lab’s (almost total lack of) response to them. I understand why you can’t properly respond to vitriolic garbage like what the last reviewer wrote. Another reviewer even went so far as to unfavourably compare Sansar to IMVU (really? really?!??).

But at least in the first few weeks, Linden Lab tried to respond to some of the criticism directed at Sansar, like Lacie’s response to 1029chris:

Sansar Steam 3 8 Jan 2019.png

And this example from early December:

Sansar on Steam 8 Jan 2019.png

And then, Linden Lab stopped responding as the negative reviews increased. As far as I can tell, there have been no responses since mid-December. Why?

Linden Lab really needs to get their PR game in gear here, and get someone to respond to at least some of the most recent negative reviews, to show that they are listening. It might still be a losing battle, but at least they would be fighting back.

And where in blazes is the “significant ad spend” promised at one of the Product Meetings last November, when the launch on Steam was first announced? And I quote:

What steps are you going to take to promote Sansar once it launches on Steam?

Eliot: expect some significant ad spend, expect some original assets. Linden Lab wants to build a community on Steam.

If Linden Lab wants to build a community on Steam, the time to start tending to that community and building positive word of mouth is NOW.

LL seems to be missing in action, while Sansar is drowning in an increasing number of thumbs-down reviews. Do something! Don’t just leave it all up to your users! Start promoting Sansar! Start responding to at least some of these negative reviews on Steam!!!

As I said before, it gives me no pleasure at all to write this. I love Sansar, and I want to see it succeed. But Linden Lab absolutely needs to step up to the plate here.

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Editorial: My Social VR/Virtual World Predictions for 2019

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Time to peer into that crystal ball and make some predictions!

First: Second Life is going to continue to coast along, baffling the mainstream news media and the general public with its vitality and longevity. It will continue to be a reliable cash cow for Linden Lab as they put a portion of that profit into building Sansar. And I also predict that the ability to change your first and last names in SL will prove very popular—and also very lucrative for Linden Lab! Remember, they’ve got seven years of pent-up demand for this feature. (I have a couple of avatars myself that I’d like to rename.)

Second: An unexpected but potentially ground-breaking development in OpenSim was the announcement of the release of a virtual reality OpenSim viewer to the open source community at the 2018 OpenSim Community Conference. There’s still lots of technical work left to do, but if they can successfully pull this off, it could mean a new era for OpenSim.

Third: I confidently predict that one or more blockchain-based virtual worlds are going to fold. Not Decentraland; there’s too much money tied up in that one to fail. But several cryptocurrency-based virtual worlds are starting to look like trainwrecks of epic proportions (and I’m looking at you, Staramaba Spaces/Materia.One). Somebody still needs to explain to me why people will want to pay to hang out with 3D-scanned replicas of Paris Hilton and Hulk Hogan. The business model makes absolutely no sense to me. Another one that I think is going to struggle in 2019 is Mark Space.

Fourth: I also predict that one or more adult/sex-oriented virtual worlds are going to fail (yes, I’m looking at you, Oasis). I’ve already gone into the reasons why even the best of them are going to find it hard to compete against the entrenched front-runner, Second Life.

Fifth: High Fidelity and Sansar will continue their friendly rivalry as both social VR platforms hold splashy events in the new year. (I’m really sorry I missed the recent preview of Queen Nefertari’s tomb in HiFi, but it looks as though there will be many other such opportunities in 2019.) And High Fidelity will continue to boast of new records in avatar capacity at well-attended events (it certainly helps that they’ve got those venture-capital dollars to spend, to offer monetary enticements for users to pile on for stress testing).

Sixth: the Oculus Quest VR headset will ignite the long-awaited boom in virtual reality that the analysts have been predicting for years. There; I’ve said it! And those social VR platforms which support Oculus Quest users will benefit.

Seventh: Linden Lab’s launch of Sansar on Steam will likely have only a modest impact on overall usage of the platform. I’m truly sorry to have to write this prediction, because I love Sansar, but we’ve got statistics we can check, and they are not looking terribly encouraging at the moment. And where is the “significant ad spend” that was promised at one of the in-world product meetups back in November? Now that they’ve pulled the trigger and launched on Steam, it’s time to promote the hell out of Sansar, using every means at Linden Lab’s disposal. Paying bounties to Twitch livestreamers is not enough.

And Facebook? If they thought 2018 was a bad year, I predict that we’re going to see even more scandals uncovered in 2019 by news organizations such as the New York Times. And more people (like me) will decide that they’ve had enough of being sold to other corporations and data-mined to within an inch of their lives, and jump ship. The public relations people at Facebook are going to face a lot of sleepless nights…

And, still on the same topic, we might yet see the launch of a new social VR platform backed by Facebook, after they decide to ditch the lamentable Facebook Spaces once and for all. Maybe it will be based on Oculus Rooms; maybe it will be something completely different. But despite my negative feelings about the social networking side of Facebook, they still have the hardware (Oculus), the money, and the reach to be a game-changer in social VR. (Just not with Facebook Spaces. At this point, they should just kill the project and start over. Any improvements will be like putting lipstick on a pig.)

Finally, I predict that the RyanSchultz.com blog will head off into new and rather unexpected directions (that is, if the past 12 months’ activity is any indication!). I never expected to cover blockchain-based virtual worlds, or Second Life freebies; they just kind of happened.  Expect more of the same in 2019, as various new topics catch my interest.

Sansar on Steam: Linden Lab May Be Fighting a Losing Battle Against the Thumbs-Down Crowd

Sansar Steam Reviews 10 Dec 2018.png

Well, the overall rating for Sansar on Steam has gone from “Positive ” to “Mostly Positive” to “Mixed” between its launch this past Wednesday and the following Sunday (in only 5 days).

The reviews are now 1/3 negative and 2/3 positive. Some of the thumbs-down reviews are by disgruntled SL users with an axe to grind. Some are trolls. Some have well-thought-out explanations of why they dislike Sansar. But it looks like the overall rating is not going to improve anytime soon. I was afraid this was going to happen.

Also, the all-time peak usage via the Steam statistics seems to be stuck at 76. Obviously, it’s still very early days though. We’ll have to wait at least a few more weeks to detect any trends.

SteamSpy Stats 10 Dec 2018.png

But it is starting to look like a similar situation might be developing to what happened when Linden Lab first launched their “open creator beta” on July 31st, 2017: a lot of people trooped in, kicked the tires, took a look around, declared themselves dissatisfied, and promptly trooped out again. (Note the slight downward trend in the overall usage stats since Wednesday on the chart above.)

Like I said, it’s really much, much to soon to make any observations. But it looks like Linden Lab is going to be facing a prolonged, losing battle with the negative reviewers.

UPDATED! Sansar on Steam: The Earliest Reviews Are In!

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Early this morning I decided to check what the reviewers on Steam are saying about Sansar (scroll to the bottom of the page), and overall, the news is pretty good! Thirty-one reviews so far (25 positive and 6 negative):

Sansar Steam Positive Reviews 7 Dec 2018.png

But, as I had feared, there are some thumbs-down reviews as well:

Sansar Steam Negative Review 2 7 Dec 2018.png

Aah yes, the “but there’s nothing to do” crowd. Somehow it seems to escape certain people that you can create your own experiences and host events in Sansar, as many people already do. Don’t expect it all to be handed to you on a silver platter, my dear. If you’ve been in Second Life for 6 years you should already have learned that. Next!

And the “grainy and blurry” comment in the second negative review? Excuse me?!?? Are we occupying the same Sansar? One of Sansar’s strongest points is its strong support for good graphics and beautiful lighting. This person must have horrible internet bandwidth or a slow computer. Or maybe he’s just a troll.

Argh, I can see that I am going to have to limit my perusal of the negative reviews. It’s gonna give me an ulcer!

However, I was very pleased to see that Linden Lab is already actively responding to negative reviews:

Sansar Steam Negative Review 7 Dec 2018.png

Linden Lab is going to need to keep on top of this. A good response can do a lot to mitigate a bad review (even though it still brings down Sansar’s overall rating on Steam).

By the way, if you are not running Sansar on Steam (i.e. you have not downloaded and installed it from Steam), then you will be unable to leave your own review or participate in the Steam Community for Sansar. Over time, that community may become more active than the official Sansar Discord server.

Also, people should know that if you install Sansar from Steam, you must use the Steam Wallet to buy Sansar dollars, and Steam gets a cut of the transaction. If you download the Sansar client directly from the Sansar website (outside of the Steam ecosystem), you can still buy Sansar dollars the same way you did before, and Steam does not get a cut of the action. That’s an important distinction to think about.

As yet, there’s no incentive for me to uninstall my current, non-Steam Sansar and reinstall it via Steam. I don’t use Steam very often and I don’t feel like giving them a cut of my transactions when I buy Sansar dollars.

And I don’t intend to post reviews; I will leave that to other people. Besides, I already have a blog where I can praise or chastise Linden Lab at length for their decisions regarding Sansar, as you might have already noticed. 😉

Interesting times ahead! And it looks like the Steam reviews page is going to be hopping with activity! In the short time that it took for me to write this blogpost, an additional three Sansar reviews were posted: two positive and one negative!

Are you thumbs-up or thumbs-down on Sansar? Feel free to leave a comment.

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Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash

UPDATE Dec. 8th: Peter Valencia (a.k.a. Theanine) has left a comment with a very useful tip for those people (like me), who might want to post a review but not actually use the Steam version of Sansar:

Some longtime users of the platform may have tried to leave a review, but to do so, they need to have run Steam Sansar for at least 5 minutes. However, if you still have the old Sansar installed, you get the error message telling you to first uninstall the non-Steam installation of Sansar.

What some might not know is that you don’t even need to login. You can just leave it open for 5 minutes with that error message still displaying. Then you can post a review. That’s what I did. I won’t be using Steam Sansar either (at least for now). I just installed it and did the trick above so I could leave a review, then uninstalled it.

Thanks, Theanine! 🙂 I have tested this and it does indeed work, provided you have bought at least $5.00 on the Steam store.