Bacardi and Coke! Real-Life Brands Are Starting to Partner with Virtual Worlds (Again): Could This Be the Start of a New Trend?

There was a time, back in the day (ohhh, let’s say, May of 2006) when a Second Life avatar named Anshe Chung graced the cover of Businessweek magazine, which told the story of how she became the first online personality to achieve a net worth exceeding one million US dollars from profits entirely earned inside a virtual world.

It can be argued that this Businessweek article, and the resulting media attention it caused, was the spark that ignited a period of explosive population growth in Second Life, as people realized that they, too, could earn money on Second Life, and they began joining the platform in ever-increasing numbers.

In particular, between late 2006 and early 2007, dozens of real-life companies and brands decided to set up shop in Second Life: Dell, Toyota, Nissan, Sun Microsystems, IBM, even American Apparel and Playboy. Unfortunately, this corporate heyday did not last long. By the end of 2008, most real-world corporations were pulling out, not seeing the benefit (i.e. profit) in running operations on a virtual world, especially during a somewhat brutal recession.

And, for a long time, burned by their initial enthusiastic foray into Second Life, most real-world brands pretty much steered clear of virtual worlds, leaving them to the mom-and-pop stores, the individual content creators who were able to make a go of it.


Well, I am starting to notice the beginnings of a new trend lately: real-life brands are starting to enter into partnerships with social VR and virtual worlds once again. Is this the start of a new trend in marketing?

Two different news items, about two completely different types of partnerships, crossed my desk yesterday, one for Bacardi rum and the other for Coca-Cola, which tickled my fancy and made me laugh (hence the clever title of this blogpost!). Both are instructive examples of how such corporate partnerships have evolved and changed since the Anshe Chung summer of 2006 in Second Life.

Barcardi and Sansar: The Casa Bacardi Virtual Island Festival

First up is a partnership between Bacardi and Sansar, a virtual festival to be held on August 20th, 2021, to promote Bacardi products. According to the event description:

Teleport to your virtual island of Casa Bacardi

Bring home some Caribbean vibes and get grooving to your favourite beats at a music experience like never before.

Casa Bacardi is a whole new virtual world on Sansar, with an epic stage for your favourite artists to perform on, games to play with your friends, hang out with them, play cocktail games and meet new people. Enjoy all of this and more from the comfort of your home along with your favourite Bacardi Cocktails.

You can even design your own look and express yourselves through your avatar before you land on Casa Bacardi Island. Festival fashion doesn’t go away, you know?

Find liberation from the real world on a virtual Caribbean island. Teleport to Casa Bacardi this Rum Month!

Performers at this event include a mix of afrobeat, hip hop, electronica and dance music artists:

  • Tesher
  • Divine and the Gully Gang
  • MC Altaf
  • Tsumyoki with Kidd Mange
  • Natasha Diggs
  • Gauriwho

Tickets are quite inexpensive, only US$1.99 for a concert pass, and US$2.99 for a concert pass plus a limited after-party event (you can pay via credit card or PayPal).

Coca-Cola, Tafi and Decentraland: The Friendship Box NFT

In a piece of news which I somehow missed, Coca-Cola entered the ultra-trendy NFT space with a limited-edition auction, partnering with the Tafi avatar creation system and the blockchain-based virtual world Decentraland (NFT, of course, stands for Non-Fungible Tokens, the concept that blockchain-based property is a unique, distinguishable, indivisible blockchain-based asset which has some sort of monetary value, usually denoted in a cryptocurrency like ETH/Ethereum).

Coca-Cola is not the first big brand name to jump into Decentraland, of course; not too long ago I wrote about how Sotheby’s set up shop. It would appear that the current unabated frenzy over blockchain, cryptocurrencies, and NFTs is bringing together some rather unlikely bedfellows!

According to the official announcement by Tafi:

Tafi announced today that it has partnered with Coca-Cola® by designing virtual wearables for Coca-Cola’s first-ever non-fungible token (NFT) collectibles offering in the “metaverse” to celebrate International Friendship Day on July 30th, Coca-Cola will be auctioning an NFT loot box on OpenSea, that contains Tafi-designed digital apparel that can be worn forever in the virtual world of Decentraland.

Tafi, a leading designer of avatars and digital wearables, is a digital strategy and development partner with Coca-Cola. Tafi worked alongside Coca-Cola to produce the NFTs, as well as Virtue, the agency by Vice, who developed the initial concept. Details of Tafi’s involvement in Coca-Cola’s NFT Lootbox can be found at https://maketafi.com/coca-cola-nft.

Coca-Cola collaborated with designers at Tafi on all the NFTs including the branded wearable apparel. Auction-goers can bid on the Coca-Cola Friendship Box, a reimagined version of Coca-Cola’s highly collectible vending machine, itself an NFT, and once opened there will be three one-of-a-kind digital assets to own: 

• A custom Coca-Cola Bubble Jacket Wearable – a futuristic jacket – is illuminated with effervescent fizz, purposely designed with subtle nods to Coke’s nostalgic delivery uniforms. It also will include an unlockable version that can be worn in the Decentraland 3D virtual reality platform. Inspired by metaverse trends and utility, the jacket features the Coca-Cola color palette, fusing the metallic red of the aluminum can and caramel brown of the delicious drink. 

The Sound Visualizer captures the experience of sharing a Coca-Cola using instantly recognizable audio cues: the pop of a bottle opening, the sound of a beverage being poured over ice, the unmistakable fizz and that first refreshing taste.

The Friendship Card reimagines the design of Coca-Cola’s famous friendship-inspired trading cards from the 1940s for the digital world. The cards bear the “Symbol of Friendship” moniker.

The first ever Coca-Cola NFT (image source)

This one-of-a-kind loot box contained some ultra-exclusive items, including a puffy jacket which can be worn by Decentraland avatars, and it sold for a whopping 217 ETH (which works out to about half a million U.S. dollars)!

Now I can tell you one thing for damn sure: no matter how luxurious and glossy that Coca-Cola puffed jacket may look on the OpenSea marketplace (and you can check out the fancy animations here), it is not going to look anywhere near as good when your avatar wears it around Decentraland! The current state of graphics in Decentraland looks like this, in case you needed a reality check:

The current state of avatar fashion in Decentraland: your glossy, expensive Coca-Cola jacket is not going to anything like what you see on the OpenSea marketplace.

Perhaps I am not the best person to explain all this, because frankly I am still mystified as to why people would want to spend outrageous sums of money on NFTs, except perhaps for bragging rights. However, it is clear that blockchain, crypto, and NFTs are not going away anytime soon (although they will not doubt continue to fluctuate wildly in value). I just report on what I see, safely from the sidelines.

And I repeat my usual warning: do EVERY. SINGLE. SCRAP. of your homework before investing a penny in any blockchain/cryptocurrency project.


Are we seeing a renaissance in such partnerships between real-world brands and social VR platforms and virtual worlds? Who knows. But it is fascinating to watch!

Pandemic Diary, August 3rd, 2021: Delta Blues

Well, it is now been a month and a half since my second vaccination, and I am heartened by reading recent research reports which show that the AstraZeneca/Pfizer combination is highly effective against the coronavirus!

I am happy to report that I have been able to visit my mother and stepfather in their seniors life-lease condo across town, give them big hugs, and even stay for supper! And last week, I finally went and got my hair cut, something I have not done since January of 2020! Yes, I am no longer rocking a ponytail!

Things are slowly, very slowly returning to something closer to normal. I’m still working from my apartment four out of five days of the week, however, and my library remains closed. My university is planning to offer a hybrid of remote and in-class learning come September (classes with fewer than 20 students will be held in person, with face masks and social distancing, while larger classes will continue to be held online and remotely).


Unlike Alberta and Saskatchewan to the west, which have already lifted their mask mandates and essentially all restrictions, Manitoba is still operating under a series of partial restrictions after a disastrous third wave of COVID-19 infections and deaths which, for a time, was the worst hotspot in all of North America.

However, the Manitoba government will begin to lift some restrictions starting next Saturday, given that our vaccination program is proceeding swiftly, indeed ahead of schedule! CBC News reported today:

As of Tuesday, 80 per cent of eligible Manitobans ages 12 and up had received one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, the news release said. The province expects to reach 75 per cent with two doses within the next week.

Those numbers were set out in the province’s reopening plan as targets for the Labour Day long weekend in September.

Contrast Manitoba with the truly lamentable and avoidable situation in the U.S., where only half the population has been fully vaccinated, and the highly-contagious Delta variant of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has led to a surge of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths among the unvaccinated in places such as Florida.

It’s clear that COVID-19 still has the capacity to throw a few curve balls at us. Stay healthy, get fully vaccinated, stay home if you can, and stay safe!

Photo by Hakan Nural on Unsplash

Better (Virtual) Homes and Gardens: I Am Hosting an Open House Until August 11th, 2021!

Many people in Second Life choose to set up a virtual home for themselves, creating a house and garden that would be impossible (or impractical!) to have in real life. There are hundreds of SL home-and-garden enthusiasts who showcase their design work via a blog or a Flickr photo account!

This blogpost is an update to one I made last Christmas, when I first moved into a community run by Bray Preston-Rising, which I have written about previously on this blog, called Bray’s Place (SLURLwebsite). In my 14 years of visiting thousands of Second Life sims, I have never received such a warm welcome, or encountered such a wonderful community!

Unfortunately, Bray has suddenly taken seriously ill, and as a result, Bray’s Place Blues club will close immediately, and the Bray’s Place sim will close on August 11th, 2021. I wanted to take the following pictures to remember this place, before it is gone forever!

Here is what my Second Life home looks like inside, plus a few pictures of the front patio and the back yard. Please click on the pictures below to see it them in a bigger size and get all the detail! I am quite happy with my little virtual home! (Now, if I could only keep my real-life home as neat and tidy as this!!)

Be sure to read the spines of the books in my bookshelf 😉

I will attempt to update this blogpost later with some details on where you can pick up my home decor; much of it is from Apple Fall (particularly the living room and kitchen). The magnificent Queen Nefertari bust on the coffee table in the final picture—something I could never hope to own in real life!—comes from the Archaeology gacha at Silas Merlin’s store and gallery (here’s the exact SLURL). The wonderful planetary orrery on the kitchen table actually works, and it is available for only L$10 on the SL Marketplace! (I found it while cam-snooping through someone else’s house, always a guilty pleasure!)

OPEN HOUSE: And if you’d like to pay a visit yourself, you’re in luck! I am holding an Open House until August 11th, 2021, when Bray’s Place sim closes. Here’s your taxi! The welcome mat is always out and Blues Music Fan Radio is always on! Please note that there are NO adult/sex animations of any kind in any of my furniture 😉 so behave yourselves!

UPDATED! Second Life Bans Gacha Machines

Have you read this blogpost? The Top 20 Controversies and Scandals in the 15-Year History of Second Life (August 2018).


Gacha machines in Second Life are devices which you pay to play. For each play, you receive a random non-copy item from a selection illustrated on the gacha machine. They have become extremely popular, and many SL brands use them. For example, Second Life shoemaker Garbaggio also has an entire section of her store set aside for gacha machines vending dolls:

The massive gacha machine section at Garbaggio
Four drag queen dolls (I did not play the gacha machines from Garbaggio to obtain these; instead I purchased them from gacha resellers on the SL Marketplace)

Today, Second Life dropped a bombshell announcement, banning gacha:

Due to a changing regulatory climate, we’ve had to make the difficult decision to sunset a very popular sales mechanism for content in Second Life.  It’s widely known as “gacha”, and is defined by a chance-based outcome as a result of a payment.  

We know that creators plan their content releases far in advance and will need to re-tool their products, so to mitigate the impact to those affected, we are giving a 30-day grace period, until midnight SLT on August 31.  After that time, selling content via gacha machines will no longer be permitted in Second Life.  Enforcement won’t start until September 1; after that date an Abuse Report for “Gaming Policy Violation” will be the preferred method of reporting this content to Linden Lab.  

We will continue to allow any sales where a payment is given for a known item, which means that items that had been purchased as “gacha” will be allowed to be re-sold as long as the buyer knows in advance the item and quantity they will receive. We will, of course, still allow fatpacks, and any other currently-allowed distribution mechanisms. 

We did not make this decision lightly and we understand that it will impact creators as well as event organizers and certainly the shoppers! We look forward to fun creative ways of engagement that will come instead. 

We realize that this announcement may leave the community with questions.  This forum thread is going to be monitored and we will answer any related questions in there. 


UPDATE August 3rd, 2021: A FAQ section has now been added to the original statement, which reads as follows:

We have developed an FAQ to assist with answering some of the most common questions we are being asked.  This list is not exhaustive, and we will continue working to get answers and add them here.

Q:  Is it possible to extend the policy deadline?

A:  We are sorry that we are not able to further extend the policy deadline.  However, we have been able to extend the enforcement of the policy change an additional 30 days.  To be clear, starting on September 1 we expect gacha as a sales mechanism to cease. However we will start with warnings, and any enforcement of the policy as it would be applied on an account will not begin until after September 30.

Q:  How are breedables impacted by this policy change?

A:  This current policy change and deadline does not apply to breedables or other life simulation products.  At the present we are working with external counsel on the subject of breedables.  If any action is required we will make a separate announcement and have a separate timeline associated with it. 

Q:  Will popular games like 7seas be impacted by this policy change?

A:  No, because the purchase of bait to go “fishing” is a purchase being made of a known item, and also the fish you catch while playing the game are non-transferable. To be clear, if they are not currently, they must be going forward.

Q: How are subscription boxes affected?

A: Subscription boxes are not affected as long as all subscribers are getting the same content box. Different items being sent to different subscribers on a chance basis is not allowed. 

Q:  How are Linden Homes affected?

A: Linden Homes are not impacted by this policy change.  Linden Lab owns the homes and they are not transferable.  

There are still several great questions which we are working to answer with our legal team.  We will update with additional information as soon as possible.


The original announcement mentions a “changing regulatory climate”, and several comments in the above linked thread bring this up, for example this one:

For people who haven’t been paying much attention to the gaming atmosphere…

Government regulatory bodies have been critically eyeing loot boxes as the gambling mechanisms they are and starting to enforce new regulations on them in various countries; and gachas are, basically, the exact same thing as a loot box.

So, I would imagine that is what is behind this decision. It’s better to be ahead of the curve than behind it.

For example, loot boxes have already been banned in Belgium and the Netherlands (both countries that Second Life operates in).

The impact of this announcement cannot be overstated. Gacha is big, BIG business in Second Life, and even with the grace period, many content creators are going to have to make significant changes in the way they sell items formerly only sold via gacha machines.

Some SL folks (myself included among them) am happy to see the end of gacha sales, feeling that they only encourage excessive gambling, especially if you only want one item from a gacha machine. I am glad to note that resellers can still sell their items won from a gacha machine, however. (However, the gacha resellers themselves might not be so happy that the sales mechanism that enables their business is ending!)

More details later as I receive them!


UPDATE 2:45 p.m.: Patch Linden has posted the following update to the official thread on the Second Life Community forums:

I wanted to address a few themes I’m seeing so far.  

One of the bigger one’s is ‘why’?   As we mentioned in the post, the regulatory climate around these sorts of selling mechanisms abroad have been under scrutiny for some time, as many have also already mentioned.  This includes the formation of some precedence already in place.  We did not make this decision without a lot of thought on the impact this has and sadly we know how burdensome this can be for many.  Through legal guidance, we are giving as much notice as we possibly can, but we also understand that it may not be enough is all cases.  While we will begin enforcement on September 1, we will not start this out with an aggressive approach.  Your account will not be at risk on a first offense basis.  Please don’t take that as an opportunity to break the rules until you get caught, but we are committed to taking a proactive approach to any enforcement. 

Next, is some of the comments on the mechanism or the gacha machines themselves.  It is the act of paying for something and in return the item/thing you receive back is based on chance.  The level of chance does not matter, or if you disclose it, including the ratios, percentages, etc, if the output is unknown (chance based in any way), that combination of mechanisms is what will be prohibited moving forward.

I have seen some interesting counter-points to how to handle the sales of the content themselves.  Of course any already purchased gachas will continue to be able to be re-sold by resellers so long as the sales mechanism doesn’t use a chance based outcome to give you the item.  Limited quantity items is another that would be perfectly ok to do, so long as the item being represented for purchase is what you receive upon purchase.

As posts are still coming in faster than we can respond to, we will do our best to respond as quickly as we can.


UPDATE 6:45 p.m.: Nodoka Hanamura has posted a Twitter thread FAQ about this, which I would like to thank her for, and reproduce here:

I will be giving a FAQ in this thread.

Now, fair warning as a conflict of interest, I am technically a gacha reseller, who sells them on the Marketplace, though that’s mainly because I still have some stock left there, and even then It’s not that much of an income for me – but regardless, I thought that It’d be best to note.

Q: I am a content creator that distributes content via Gacha. What do I have to do?
A: All Gacha Machines must either be disabled or removed from your store effective August 31st to avoid punitive action from Linden Lab. You are not prohibited from selling the contents of the gacha as individual items or as a ‘fatpack’ in a conventional sales format, in fact, i, and I would assume Linden Lab as well, encourage that you do so.

Q: I am a gacha reseller. Do I need to stop selling my Items?
A: Due to the fact that gacha reselling does not involve gambling, gacha reselling is permissible under the revisions to Linden Lab’s Skill Gaming Policy, under which gacha now applies.

Q: Why is this happening? Why Is Linden Lab destroying a profitable method of selling Items in Second Life?
A: The reason being is that, for anyone familiar with the video games industry and subsequently, legislative bodies’ interests regarding the industry, many national and regional legislatures have made their intent known to either ban or extensively regulate gacha and loot boxes, seeing them as equivalent to gambling.

While there is a debate to be had on the efficacy and justification of banning and regulating gambling, this is not going to spare Linden Lab, nor content creators, the gavel if they are taken to court by California, U.S., or other state and national courts for violating their laws. I know this will frustrate many people.

I know many people will point at Linden Lab and say it is their fault. But this is for the best. For the longevity of Second Life and the prosperity of our platform, we must sacrifice gacha so that we can continue legally existing…Again, I cannot stress this enough. This isn’t something LL did to spite people. This is because it was either they banned gacha, or LL would be in hot water for hosting it…


UPDATE 7:24 p.m.: I particularly like this comment from the official thread, especially the final point made:

Ok, lets break this down to rawest principles…

1: $L are directly convertible to and from $US and so to a regulator they are “real money” assets, in spite of any “in-game token” language. Anything you pay for with $L will be viewed as a “real money transaction” by those regulators and their enforcement arms.

2: loot boxes, i.e. random rewards for a fixed payment in-game, which can be purchased with “real money” are being regulated and/or banned at a swift clip around the world in many jurisdictions including several US states. These jurisdictions almost uniformly class such things as “gambling” and draw their regulation and enforcement authority from the laws that exist almost everywhere to control gambling. Loot boxes for real money are regarded as equivalent to slot machines.

3: Gacha machines are loot-box vendors in which the chances of a particular item and the relative value of the items it is possible to get are completely outside LL’s control.

4: Whether such a definition as in #2 above is right or not is irrelevant. It either is, or is becoming, the legal lens through which such things are viewed almost everywhere. As such, LL MUST become compliant with those laws and regulations. Since they CANNOT regulate Gacha machines to the extent required for their existence to be compliant, due to their lack of control over their configuration, they are gone. Period.

5: Merchants who “make more money from Gachas than I ever would selling the individual items” are not victims here. They are the “poster children” for the predatory nature of a gambling-based sales model, setting the reward odds to “favor the house” every time. If selling the individual items as known items for a price commensurate to their actual value leads to lower profits, that difference in profit level is entirely due to the odds favoring the house in the gambling element. As such rather than protesting they should be allowed to continue fleecing their marks it would be better to zip it, quietly fold their tents and go looking for the next bunko game that hasn’t been caught yet. Any carnie knows how that part works.

Harsh, but accurate!


UPDATE August 3rd, 2021: If the official Second Life Community forums thread (now at a whopping 51 pages long!) isn’t enough for you, there’s also a lively thread over on the r/secondlife subReddit in Reddit!

Also, two lists have already sprung up, to keep track of the special deals many SL stores are offering in the final legal month of gacha sales:


UPDATE August 4th, 2021: Very early this morning, Patch Linden had posted another update to the official thread:

…[W]hatever comes out on the other end of this can no longer be called “gacha”.  Make no illusions or ways to circumvent getting around it, but “gacha” is gone for good; we should not call it that anymore going forward with any proposed idea to reincarnate it in some way.  We have been seeing a lot of good suggestions on new, interesting ways to sell content, many of which we have given to our general counsel for further legal opinion.  When we have that information back, the FAQ will be updated.

We have also been analyzing the 7seas Fishing Game further (yes, we play it 🐠), and there is another mechanic at play which is the one-time purchase of the fishing rod (free or paid). The fishing rod to catch fish is all that is really required to play the game, there is no additional purchase required and with that you can catch all the fish (or other items) you desire.  In effect, the catches are free and have no value.  Purchasing bait to play the game gives experience for competition.  If purchasing bait increases the value of the fish (or items) caught, then the fish (or items) would then have to be no transfer.   I have seen some suggestions that it is a disguise to legalize gambling and a handful of other theories to twist the mechanics of the game.  This is clearly not the case and that is spreading misinformation, which needs to cease immediately.  

On edit:  Further in the problematic mechanics of the gacha systems, and in addition to what I said earlier, regarding the act of paying for something and in return the item/thing you receive back can not be based on chance, this includes the purchaser must know what they are purchasing in advance of the sale being made.  In other words, the purchaser must clearly see and understand what they are purchasing at the time of sale.