The Most Popular Sansar Experiences of the Past Week (Pie Chart)

Gindipple posted the following pie chart to the official Sansar Discord channel (click on the picture to go to Flickr and see it in a larger size):

Most Popular Sansar Experiences 8 Dec 2018

Gindipple explains that the high figures for one experience, Fnatic (the green slice in the pie chart), were due to people coming into that experience to get a prize key for another game. Which might be the very first occurrence of somebody gaming the traffic figures in Sansar (a long-standing practice in Second Life).

Top five most popular Sansar experiences in the past 7 days were:

  1. Scurry Waters, by Medhue and Bagnaria
  2. Once Upon a Midnight Dream, by Solas
  3. Fnatic Media BUNKR, by the Fnatic team
  4. 2077, by C3rb3rus (more info here)
  5. No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man, by Smithsonian American Art (more info here)

So, go explore! There has been a definite increase in the number of new people visiting Sansar since it was launched on Steam this past Wednesday. And Friday night at the TurnupVR-sponsored pub crawl was amazing! Over 32 people showed up at Solas’ bar and danced, laughed and broke bottles. It was absolute chaos at times, with everybody excitedly talking over each other, and it reminded me of the early days of VRChat. I think we can say that Sansar has definitely arrived! :rofl:

So maybe—just maybe—I was wrong about Linden Lab releasing Sansar on Steam too early. We’ll see how the numbers stack up over time. We now have lots of statistics at our disposal!

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Let’s Talk Stats: The Various Sansar User Statistics Now Available, and Why They Differ From Each Other

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Image by Mediamodifier on Pixabay

Now that Linden Lab has launched on Steam, we have quite a few different statistics available, some of which may which may contradict each other. Gindipple recently shared some rather encouraging statistics on the official Sansar Discord, which show an overall increasing trend in the average number of daily and monthly Sansar users:

Gindipple's Sansar Stats 6 Dec 2018.png

Galen’s live statistics page also shows an encouraging increase in peak and average Sansar visitors over time:

Galen's Sansar Statistics 6 Dec 2018.png

Gindipple’s and Galen’s statistics will differ because they take samples of the user data at different times, using a publicly available API. One may sample the data more often than another; I don’t know how often Gindipple samples the data, but Galen says he takes a sample approximately every 10 minutes.

And Linden Lab CEO Ebbe Altberg said on the official Sansar Discord channel this morning:

Steam tracks [people] logged in via Steam. Gindipple]/Galen log people in [Sansar] experiences that are public. We [Linden Lab] count them all – regardless how they logged in, where they are or what they do. 3 different numbers where ours will always be the bigger, sum of all, number.

As far as I am aware, Linden Lab does not publish their statistics, which are internal to the company. (If this is incorrect, then could somebody from Linden Lab let me know, and then I will update this blogpost accordingly, thank you!)

Now that Sansar is on Steam, we can also get statistics which Steam collects. Steam Charts offers what it calls “an ongoing analysis of Steam’s concurrent players” (here’s the link for all the data it currently has on Sansar):

Steam Charts Sanar 6 Dec 2018.png

Obviously, there’s not a lot of data yet to see yet! 😉

There’s also a more detailed statistical graph available on this page on Steam:

Sansar Steam Stats 2.png

Interestingly, please notice that the latter Steam graph gives a different 24-hour peak usage than the former (the top one says the peak usage in the past 24 hours is 65 users, while the bottom one says it is 75).

So now we have a wealth of different data showing us just how much Sansar is being used! This is a vast improvement over the early days in Sansar, where most of the time we had to guess how many people were using the platform.

Six Months of Average Sansar User Concurrency Statistics

Gindipple has recently released a snapshot of average user concurrency statistics for Sansar over the past six months or so, automatically scraped from the figures of how many avatars are in what experiences from the Sansar Atlas listing. Please click on the image to load it in a larger size:

The upper part of the diagram shows daily average concurrent Sansar users over the past year. There are a lot of peaks and valleys in the data, but what’s disappointing is that the figure never rises above 20 average concurrent users. Now, I have been to events in Sansar that have had up to 35 avatars present (such as the popular Product Meetups), but you have to keep in mind that these are daily averages, so they would be lower.

The smoother data on the bottom of the diagram is monthly average concurrent Sansar users. Notice that there was a slight dip over June, then it rises again.

What’s clear is that the average number of Sansar users is not rising over time; it’s staying flat. So how can Linden Lab attract more people to Sansar, and keep them coming back?

Well, I would argue that adding new features such as custom avatars is a big step toward providing the kind of platform that attracts content creators, who in turn will attract consumers. Bumping up the number of free experiences you can create from 3 to 20 was also a good step in fostering creativity. Finally, I know that a permissions/licensing system for content creators (which Landon told us would be coming sooner rather than later) will also attract new investment in the platform.

What do you think Linden Lab needs to do to attract and keep new users? Should they list Sansar on Steam and the Oculus store? Sound off in the comments, thanks!

Sansar Pick of the Day: The Combat Zone

One of the wonderful things about Sansar are the collaborations which have sprung up as people work together on projects. One example of this is The Combat Zone, where Gindipple the programmer and Nya Alchemi the mesh content creator have worked together to create a fun, fast, first-person-shooter capture the flag game with a Desert Storm feel. HoverDerby now has some serious competition in the esports department!

When you arrive at The Combat Zone lobby, you face three entrances. Enter the door with the blue light above it and you are on the Blue team, and entering the opposite door with the red light above it puts you on the Red team.

Combat Zone 6 7 May 2018.png

Combat Zone 5 7 May 2018.png

You can pick up a gun at your compound, and use that, or you can get a paintball gun attachment for your arm ahead of time from the Sansar Store for free (male or female models, which Nya Alchemi made). Note that you can play in desktop mode just as easily as you can in a VR headset. Instructions are on the signs in the lobby.

Paintball Guns 7 May 2018.png

Scoring is pretty simple. Hitting a target dummy with a paintball gets you one point, hitting an opposing team member gets you 2 points. If you hit your own teammate by accident, you lose a point. If you capture the other team’s flag, you win 30 points. The first team to accumulate 100 points wins the game.

Combat Zone 8 7 May 2018.png

Solas has made T-shirts for both male and female avatars, for both the Red and Blue teams, which are also available for free on the Sansar Store.

Solas' T Shirts 7 May 2018.png

But Alfy has really gone all out, creating helmets, fatigue pants and shirts, vests, ammunition belts, and combat boots to make a complete outfit, for both Red and Blue teams, and both men and women! In the picture below, I am wearing the men’s complete Blue team outfit and Nya’s paintball gun attachment. All these items are free from the Sansar Store, just search for “paintball” to find Nya’s, Solas’s and Alfy’s items for The Combat Zone.

Combat Zone 7 May 2018.png

If you’d rather watch the game than play, from The Combat Zone entrance lobby, take the elevator in the middle (with the camel) and you are teleported to the spectators’ viewpoint, an invisible floor high above the playing field that gives you a complete birds-eye view of the entire playing field and the scoreboard.

Combat Zone 3 7 May 2018.png

Combat Zone 4 7 May 2018

Gindipple tells me that he has spent about four months working on the coding for The Combat Zone. For example, he can issue God commands that completely rearrange the random placement of the buildings and palm trees on the playing field, to make it more crowded or more sparse as required.

One great part of the game is the target dummies! They are randomly-appearing flat-panel Ebbe Altberg figures (in his now-trademark dreadlocks and rainbow T-shirt) which pop up now and again for you to target with your paint balls!

Here’s Gindipple himself posing in front of a camel in game. The top bar above his head indicates his team (blue); the second green bar indicates his level of health (100%). If your health goes down to zero, you die, so try your best to evade the paintballs from the other side!

Combat Zone 2 7 May 2018

Games are usually scheduled at 7:00 p.m. Sansar Time/Pacific Time, and Gindipple tells me that he usually gets between 8 and 12 people showing up to play.

The Combat Zone is yet another potent argument against the “Sansar is pretty but there’s nothing to do” naysayers. With the dedicated work of scripters like Gindipple and designers like Nya Alchemi, the opportunities in Sansar are indeed almost endless, and limited only by the imaginations of the creators!