Sansar User Concurrency Statistics: Has Launching on Steam Made Any Difference?

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The short answer is “yes, but barely”. Gindipple was kind enough to share his statistics with the official Sansar Discord channel.

The first diagram is one year’s worth of statistics, showing the daily and monthly average of concurrent Sansar users. There is a noticable spike in users around the time of the Steam launch on both graphs:

Gindipple also shared the following graph, saying:

Of particular interest is this graph that shows the last 2 weeks. The spikes are the comedy event and a product meetup.

Let’s compare with the stats collected by Galen on his Metaverse Machines Live Sansar Statistics page, which displays both average and peak figures:

The news from both sets of graphs is about the same. Both show a noticeable spike in Sansar usage due to the Steam launch, but unfortunately, many of those users did not seem to stick around. However, there does seem to be a small uptick in the total number of simultaneous Sansar users overall, comparing the periods before and after the Steam launch.

Also, both Galen’s and Gindipple’s statistics show that Sansar is now hitting up to 80 concurrent users at a time, mostly due to events such as the stand-up comedy series. This is a definite improvement, although I’m quite sure that Linden Lab wants much higher numbers than that.

So, the struggle continues. And Linden Lab is far from alone in trying to figure out the magic formula that will bring users in—and make them come back. The only social VR platform which is still consistently packing the users in is VRChat (with Rec Room a distant second).

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The Most Popular Sansar Experiences of the Past Week (Pie Chart)

Gindipple posted the following pie chart to the official Sansar Discord channel (click on the picture to go to Flickr and see it in a larger size):

Most Popular Sansar Experiences 8 Dec 2018

Gindipple explains that the high figures for one experience, Fnatic (the green slice in the pie chart), were due to people coming into that experience to get a prize key for another game. Which might be the very first occurrence of somebody gaming the traffic figures in Sansar (a long-standing practice in Second Life).

Top five most popular Sansar experiences in the past 7 days were:

  1. Scurry Waters, by Medhue and Bagnaria
  2. Once Upon a Midnight Dream, by Solas
  3. Fnatic Media BUNKR, by the Fnatic team
  4. 2077, by C3rb3rus (more info here)
  5. No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man, by Smithsonian American Art (more info here)

So, go explore! There has been a definite increase in the number of new people visiting Sansar since it was launched on Steam this past Wednesday. And Friday night at the TurnupVR-sponsored pub crawl was amazing! Over 32 people showed up at Solas’ bar and danced, laughed and broke bottles. It was absolute chaos at times, with everybody excitedly talking over each other, and it reminded me of the early days of VRChat. I think we can say that Sansar has definitely arrived! :rofl:

So maybe—just maybe—I was wrong about Linden Lab releasing Sansar on Steam too early. We’ll see how the numbers stack up over time. We now have lots of statistics at our disposal!

Let’s Talk Stats: The Various Sansar User Statistics Now Available, and Why They Differ From Each Other

graph-3033203_1280.jpg
Image by Mediamodifier on Pixabay

Now that Linden Lab has launched on Steam, we have quite a few different statistics available, some of which may which may contradict each other. Gindipple recently shared some rather encouraging statistics on the official Sansar Discord, which show an overall increasing trend in the average number of daily and monthly Sansar users:

Gindipple's Sansar Stats 6 Dec 2018.png

Galen’s live statistics page also shows an encouraging increase in peak and average Sansar visitors over time:

Galen's Sansar Statistics 6 Dec 2018.png

Gindipple’s and Galen’s statistics will differ because they take samples of the user data at different times, using a publicly available API. One may sample the data more often than another; I don’t know how often Gindipple samples the data, but Galen says he takes a sample approximately every 10 minutes.

And Linden Lab CEO Ebbe Altberg said on the official Sansar Discord channel this morning:

Steam tracks [people] logged in via Steam. Gindipple]/Galen log people in [Sansar] experiences that are public. We [Linden Lab] count them all – regardless how they logged in, where they are or what they do. 3 different numbers where ours will always be the bigger, sum of all, number.

As far as I am aware, Linden Lab does not publish their statistics, which are internal to the company. (If this is incorrect, then could somebody from Linden Lab let me know, and then I will update this blogpost accordingly, thank you!)

Now that Sansar is on Steam, we can also get statistics which Steam collects. Steam Charts offers what it calls “an ongoing analysis of Steam’s concurrent players” (here’s the link for all the data it currently has on Sansar):

Steam Charts Sanar 6 Dec 2018.png

Obviously, there’s not a lot of data yet to see yet! 😉

There’s also a more detailed statistical graph available on this page on Steam:

Sansar Steam Stats 2.png

Interestingly, please notice that the latter Steam graph gives a different 24-hour peak usage than the former (the top one says the peak usage in the past 24 hours is 65 users, while the bottom one says it is 75).

So now we have a wealth of different data showing us just how much Sansar is being used! This is a vast improvement over the early days in Sansar, where most of the time we had to guess how many people were using the platform.

Six Months of Average Sansar User Concurrency Statistics

Gindipple has recently released a snapshot of average user concurrency statistics for Sansar over the past six months or so, automatically scraped from the figures of how many avatars are in what experiences from the Sansar Atlas listing. Please click on the image to load it in a larger size:

The upper part of the diagram shows daily average concurrent Sansar users over the past year. There are a lot of peaks and valleys in the data, but what’s disappointing is that the figure never rises above 20 average concurrent users. Now, I have been to events in Sansar that have had up to 35 avatars present (such as the popular Product Meetups), but you have to keep in mind that these are daily averages, so they would be lower.

The smoother data on the bottom of the diagram is monthly average concurrent Sansar users. Notice that there was a slight dip over June, then it rises again.

What’s clear is that the average number of Sansar users is not rising over time; it’s staying flat. So how can Linden Lab attract more people to Sansar, and keep them coming back?

Well, I would argue that adding new features such as custom avatars is a big step toward providing the kind of platform that attracts content creators, who in turn will attract consumers. Bumping up the number of free experiences you can create from 3 to 20 was also a good step in fostering creativity. Finally, I know that a permissions/licensing system for content creators (which Landon told us would be coming sooner rather than later) will also attract new investment in the platform.

What do you think Linden Lab needs to do to attract and keep new users? Should they list Sansar on Steam and the Oculus store? Sound off in the comments, thanks!