UPDATED! HOUSEKEEPING NOTICE: Testing Patreon-Exclusive Blogposts on the RyanSchultz.com Blog

Over the past month, I have been testing out Patreon-exclusive, paywalled blogposts on my blog. For example, if you are not a Patreon patron (more info here), you would only see a paywall message when you click on the link below. (By the way, this post is, by far, the most popular blogpost on my blog, mainly because it is the first result when people do a Google search for “vrchat adult”.)

The Dirty Little Secret of VRChat—Hidden Adult Content

UPDATE May 9th, 2022: After watching BrandonFM’s documentary (more details here), I have made the decision to un-paywall that particular blogpost.

I set it so that you would have to sign up to be a patron of my Patreon, and have paid me at least US$1, to be able to access and read this blogpost (which, by the way, is quite safe for work AND DOES NOT PROVIDE ANY LINKS TO NSFW VRCHAT WORLDS, talking about the topic in a very general way only). I just got so tired of having a page with so much traffic, and so I put a paywall on it! It doesn’t seem to have dented the traffic one bit.

And, as I have discovered, people are indeed willing to pay me a dollar just to read that particular blogpost (or one of the other two I set up in this way). So, moving forward, I reserve the right to begin imposing such a paywall on some of my content.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

As I have said before on this blog a couple of years ago, I need become a little more business-minded about how I operate the RyanSchultz.com blog. Selling advertising and offering sponsored blogposts at US$50 a pop is part of that, and this will become an additional tool in my mercantile arsenal. I do hope that you will understand.

P.S. If you do want to make a one-time financial donation and don’t want to use Patreon to do it, you can buy me a coffee using Ko-Fi or Buy Me a Coffee. Thanks!

Making Money Off the Metaverse

Did you know that you can help support my blog (as well as the Metaverse Newscast show), and get great rewards in return? Here’s how.


Recently I was approached by an entrepreneur who wanted me to work with him to expand and monetize my comprehensive list of social VR platforms and virtual worlds. I told him I would think about it and get back to him in a couple of weeks. I also was told by social VR researcher and consultant Jessica Outlaw that she used and appreciated my comparison chart of the 12 most popular social VR platforms (which I do need to update soon). This has made me realize that I am one of the few people out there who are actively compiling this sort of information about social virtual reality, and that people are finding it useful.

My comparison chart of social VR platforms (full-size version available here)

I think what I will do (rather than throw my lot in with the entrepreneur and try to make money off my labour) is try to work something up for publication in a research journal instead. Working for a university, I tend to have more of an academic than an entrepreneurial bent anyways. Then I could add it to my résumé for the next time I apply for a promotion at work (assuming I do so before I decide to retire).

Which beings me to today’s topic: people making money off the metaverse. I’m actually already making a little money in two ways:

  1. serving advertising from WordPress’ WordAds and Google’s AdSense on my blog (which brings in anywhere from $5 to $35 per month);
  2. my Patreon page (currently bringing in $13 a month from 7 supporters—thank you!).

This money earned goes toward my blog hosting costs with WordPress (I have their Business plan at $33 a month, billed annually). Every little bit helps!

Other people are generating income by creating content for the metaverse: mesh buildings, trees, and furniture, avatar clothing and attachments, animations, etc. In fact, some Second Life content creators actually are able to make a decent living wage from their work (but they are definitely in the minority; most creators earn only a secondary income from SL, and some do it just for the creative outlet).

I’ve heard that some people are making good money creating and selling custom avatars for VRChat, but I’m not certain that anyone is making a full-time living at it.

A few people like Bernhard Drax (a.k.a Draxtor Despres) have been able to parlay their video-making work into a lucrative side hustle, working for companies such as Linden Lab to help promote their products. Strawberry Singh, who is well-known for her pictures and videos of Second Life, even landed up getting hired by Linden Lab! And who’s to say that what happened to Drax and Berry can’t happen to you, too?

While I seriously doubt that anybody is making a living wage off the various social VR platforms so far (except for the people working for companies creating the platforms, like High Fidelity and Linden Lab), we can expect that at some point in the future, individual entrepreneurs will generate a good income from social VR. The big questions are where and when it will happen, not if. Many people are waiting on the sidelines, honing their skills and biding their time, to see which social VR platforms will take off in popularity. There’s no sense dumping a lot of time and money into a platform if nobody’s using it.

What do you think of all this? Do you think that we are still years away from people earning a living off the metaverse? Feel free to share your opinions in the comments section, or better yet, join the RyanSchultz.com Discord server, the first cross-worlds Discord where people discuss and debate the issues surrounding social VR and virtual worlds. We’d love to have you with us!

You Better Work! A Comprehensive Guide to Jobs in Second Life for Newbies

Image by mohamed_hassan on Pixabay

Sylvannas Zulaman has just posted a wonderfully detailed introductory guide for those new to Second Life, about how to get a job to earn some money. (And yes, there is no free money. Girl, you betta work!)

Here’s the link to her post in the official Second Life user forums. I think it’s a wonderful service to SL’s userbase. (I added my own comment about how to meet the requirement of many public-service type jobs such as host, DJ, customer service rep, stripper, escort, etc. for a modern mesh avatar without spending a fortune.)

Second Life Steals, Deals, and Freebies: How Do I Earn Free Money in Second Life?

sharon-mccutcheon-665638-unsplash.jpg
Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

It never fails to happen. A newbie (i.e., someone new to Second Life) gets onto one of the SL forums and asks the inevitable question:

How do I earn free money in Second Life?

And the answer, of course, is that you can’t.

In the old days (say, a decade ago), you used to be able to hit the camping spots to earn a few Lindens. Those days are long gone; the very few camping spots that still exist in Second Life are closely guarded secrets, and the chances of you earning any amount of money by camping are pretty much history. Most camping spots earn you, at most, L$1 per 10 minutes, and most are L$1 per hour (and that’s if you can find them).

The closest thing I have found to “free money” in Second Life nowadays is the Magic Fishing system, and even then, you are limited to earning about 15 Linden dollars per fishing session, before the system locks you out for a period of time (usually something like 24 hours before you can try again at the same spot). You’re going to be fishing a long, long time to earn enough for that Catwa Bento head you’ve been eyeing.

If you happen to be good at trivia, you can earn some money by participating in the trivia tournaments which are held at various bars and other locations in SL. Join the Trivia Fiends group in-world, which regularly posts details on trivia contests in Second Life. However, you usually only win L$1 per correct answer, so it still can take quite a long time to amass enough money to buy something.

Your best chances of earning money in Second Life are to get a job. And the highest-earning jobs are those designing and creating content like clothing, hair, shoes, furnishings, trees, houses, animations, etc. that other avatars want to buy. And there’s a pretty steep learning curve associated with learning how to become a successful content creator in Second Life. Not to mention, it’s a lot of exhausting work to build a store and promote your brand in Second Life, competing against literally hundreds of other vendors. It’s not for everyone. You will likely spend weeks, months, even years working on your products before you can earn a significant income from them.

If you don’t have the time, skills, or patience to become a content creator, there are other types of jobs in-world. Clubs are always looking for DJs or hosts, and that is probably your best bet. You may also be lucky to find a business that needs customer service agents (e.g. a popular fashion store, or a land rental agency). Forget about becoming a fashion model; most stores now use alts (i.e. the creator’s alternate avatar accounts) as their fashion models or mannequins.

You can also try your luck working as an exotic dancer or even an escort (God knows, there’s enough places where you could work in SL), but you’ll need to have a very professional appearance (i.e., a mesh avatar head and body, plus sexy lingerie or other clothing), which means you’ll need to invest quite a few Lindens up front. Frankly, most people do not earn a lot of money by dancing or escorting (although you might hear of someone who does cam/voice work earning thousands of Linden dollars per session). And, let’s face it, not everybody has the stomach for this kind of soul-killing work.

You’re also unlikely to make money by being a blogger for Second Life, unless you’re already a well-known blogger like Strawberry Singh. There are literally hundreds of bloggers competing against each other for the limited number of official blogger spots for the best-known SL brands. If you are going to be a blogger, do it because you love it, and not because you expect to earn an income from it. The same goes for photography and videography/machinima; only the very best can make a living at it. This is not to discourage you; it’s simply stating a fact. You have to be the best to earn any money at it.

Where’s the best place to look for a job in Second Life? I would suggest that job seekers monitor the Inworld Employment section of the official Second Life discussion forums. There are also in-world employment agencies you can try (search for “job” or “employment” under the Places tab under Search in your Second Life client software), but don’t be surprised to find the same jobs (mostly for escorts) at the various agencies.

Finally, the most fool-proof method for earning Lindens is to BUY them on your credit card. Hate to break it to you, but it’s true.